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Improving Digital Knowledge and Receptivity among Senior Leadership in UK Government

Workshop:

Improving Digital Knowledge and Receptivity among Senior Leadership in UK Government

Thursday 08 March 2018, 2 - 6 pm
Cripps Court, Magdalene College
Event hosted by the Cambridge Institute for Public Policy

Organised by Russell Davies and Tanya Filer

How do we ensure that senior leadership understands how digital technologies can impact and transform government, and on the basis of that knowledge make informed decisions on digital uptake and usage? Our workshop will attend to this question by considering methods for increasing digital knowledge and receptivity among senior leaders in UK government. The idea is to bring together a set of practitioners and academics to reflect on successes and failures to date and on possible next steps.

The event will include both a retrospective dimension and consideration of transferable lessons from other sectors, other bodies of knowledge that public sector senior leadership tends to value (eg. economic), and other countries.

We hope that this initial workshop may lead to further events and spark collaborative outputs.

Purpose of the Workshop

We hope to:

  • Reflect on successes and failures – what has and hasn’t worked.
  • Share policy-relevant knowledge, research and ideas on improving digital knowledge and receptivity among senior leadership in UK Government.
  • Explore ways in which Industrial Strategy, and the current political moment more broadly, offers opportunities for senior leadership to engage with digital topics.
  • Strengthen the network of academics and policy makers working on the area and consider next steps.

To RSVP email: Barbara Bennett, CIPP administrator, bb314@cam.ac.uk.

Further details are forthcoming.

This is a small, invitation-only workshop - please do not forward this invitation.

The event will be followed by a drinks reception.

For more information on CIPP's work on government and digital technologies visit 'The Digital State' research pages.